Toxic Chemicals, Micro Plastics, Ocean Acidification and Climate Change

Time is running out, priority chemical, ocean acidification induced pollution will cause a trophic cascade collapse of the ecosystem in 25 to 40 years


















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The world manufactures 30,000 tonnes a year of organic tin as a plasticiser used in PVC, it is still even used as antifouling paint on the hull of container ships. If 1000 tonnes were to dissolve into the oceans all at the one time, it will kill all marine life...everywhere. Plastic is building up in ocean sediment, micro-plastics and nanoplastics are adsorbed by marine life, it ends up back in the food chain and in people.  What Goes Around Comes Around, all marine life and people, now contain nano plastic and priority chemicals. 

Toxic priority chemicals adsorbed onto hydrophobic nano particles such as plastic, from washing your fleece and zeolites used in washing up detergents, concentrate the priority chemicals and inject them into bacteria, algae and plankton.  We depend upon the route of the oceanic food chain for our very survival, it is being destroyed and few people actually know it is happening.  We have around 25 years before a cascade failure, and if we lose the marine ecosystem, the terrestrial system will follow.

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  • The concentration of priority chemicals such as PCBs and PBDE from fire retardants in carpets, cloths and foam products are now off-the-scale in most marine mammals.
  • 90% of all cancers suffered by people are known to be of environmental origin
  • Male fertility has dropped by 50% in Europe due to hormones and endocrine disrupters.
  • Marine mammals as well as humans as a biological defense mechanism, dump toxins into the foetus and in milk. The toxins / priority chemicals are then implicated in causing neurological disorders and are cancer precursors
  • We are not only destroying the ecosystem; we are killing ourselves

Why should we care what happens to the Oceans ?

80% of the worlds oxygen is produced in the oceans by microscopic plants, and 30% of the carbon dioxide is fixed by organisms smaller than 0.05mm.  We know that atmospheric oxygen levels are dropping and carbon dioxide concentrations are increasing.

Most life on earth lives in the oceans, and is too small to seen by eye, according to NASA, the microscopic life forms are dying off at a rate of 1% every year.  This means that almost 1% off all life on the planet is dying every year. Research from Universities such as Dalhousie in Nova Scotia, published in Nature, report that more than 40% of all microscopic life has died since the 1950s, the start of the chemical revolution as opposed to the industrial reveolution.  As a consequence, the oceans are losing their ability to sequester carbon dioxide which means that carbon dioxide concentrations are increasing, making the oceans more acidic.  

The pH (acidity) has dropped from 8.26 to 8.06 over the last 50 years. Over the next 25 to 40 years it will drop to pH7.9, at which point there will be a cascade failure of the marine ecosystem, and we lose all the teleost fish, whales, seals, birds and food supply for 2 billion people.

Increasing temperatures and carbon dioxide, as well as all the nutrients from pollution should increase primary productivity, yet we are see a drop of 1% every year.  This situation is not sustainable, but why is it happening?  we know that it is certainly not climate change. 

Priority chemical pollution in combination with hydrophobic micro and nano particles is the explanation. Reducing CO2 emissions is not going to have any impact, we need to also reduce and eliminate priority chemicals such as PCBs, PBDE, mercury and organic tins.



Coral bleaching may not be due to climate change

Coral are a symbiotic organism between a filter feeding animal and an algae. We know that priority chemicals will be adsorbed onto hydrophobic particles such as plastic, if therefore follows that corals will likely have a higher concentration of priority chemicals.

Priority chemicals will therefore be concentration in the coral. Water temperature will of course cause also cause bleaching, but a high temperature is likely to make the priority chemicals more toxic. The question now is which parameter is the most important. states that the priority chemicals are more relevant.

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